Team

Casey T. Tegreene

Executive Vice President, Invention Science Funds; Chief Patent Counsel

Casey T. Tegreene is executive vice president and chief patent counsel at Intellectual Ventures (IV) as well as managing member of Invention Science Fund II and the Global Good Fund. Mr. Tegreene has headed the Invention Science Funds (ISF) since their inception and leads their efforts in invention development, licensing, startup and product development, as well as overall management. Mr. Tegreene is an acknowledged expert and has been an invited speaker on invention processes as well as the generation and commercialization of intellectual property across a broad spectrum of technologies.

Over the past decade, Mr. Tegreene’s organization has founded several companies around ISF technologies in communications, imaging, medical, software and radar technologies and has established a world-leading Metamaterials Commercialization Center at IV. Additionally, he has assisted several ISF inventors to become fixtures in the top 10 most prolific inventor lists in the United States and partnered with several companies around the world to bolster their innovation.

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Mr. Tegreene is a prolific inventor and is named on more than 700 patents relating to a wide variety of technologies.

Mr. Tegreene is a co-founder of several ISF spinout companies and serves as a member of the board of directors of Kymeta Corporation, twice named to CNBC’s annual list of most disruptive technologies.

Prior to joining IV, Mr. Tegreene served as chief technology officer for Microvision, Inc., a publicly traded, Seattle-based photonics company. In addition, he was a co-founder of Lumera Corporation, a pioneer in electro-active polymer materials and devices for optical communications applications, also a publicly traded company.

Earlier in his career, Mr. Tegreene practiced at Seed & Berry, an intellectual property law firm in the Northwest, where he specialized in intellectual property matters. Additionally, Mr. Tegreene specialized in corporate transactional work at Cravath, Swaine & Moore, a New York general practice law firm. He has also been a research engineer at Motorola.

Mr. Tegreene holds a J.D. from the New York University School of Law (Law Review), a master’s degree in electrical engineering from Georgia Institute of Technology, and a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering (cum laude) from the University of South Florida. Mr. Tegreene is a member of the Washington and New York state bars, and is registered to practice before the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.

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Russell Hannigan

Russell Hannigan

Senior Director

Russell is Senior Director within the ISF Commercialization Team, and is responsible for incubating new technologies with clear customer requirements. Russell identified how ISF’s metamaterials technology could enable affordable, all-electronic beam steering antennas for satellite communications, leading to the spin-out of Kymeta. He is also a founder of two other metamaterials-based companies: Echodyne and Pivotal Commware. Russell invented and is incubating the Multiple User Video Intelligence Array (MUVIA) technology platform.

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Prior to joining ISF, Russell was Director of Product Management at Microvision (2001-2009), Director of Business Development at Teledesic (1999-2001), Director of Satellite Communications at KPMG (1997-1999), Principal Consultant at ESYS (1992-1997), an Independent Aerospace Industry Consultant (1990-1992) and a Systems Engineer at British Aerospace (1985-1990). Russell is a US Citizen and has a B.Sc. (Hons) degree in Physics from the University of Manchester, England (1982-1985). He attended the inaugural session of the International Space University held at MIT (1988).

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Guy Lipworth, Ph.D.

Metamaterial Specialist

Guy Lipworth received his PH.D from Duke University’s Center for Metamaterials and Integrated Plasmonics (CMIP) under the mentorship of Professor David Smith. Guy’s research at Duke University spanned a wide range of the electromagnetic spectrum, from sub-gigahertz metamaterial designs for resonant Wireless Power Transfer (WPT), to microwave and millimeter wave (MMW) holographic metamaterial apertures for security screening applications utilizing computational imaging approaches. At IV’s Metamaterial Commercialization Center, Guy is currently conducting research involving ground-breaking new applications of metamaterials.

David Nash

Electronics Scientist

David Nash joined Intellectual Ventures Laboratory in June 2008 as their first electronics scientist. Mr. Nash has over 30 years of multidisciplinary (electronics/optics/mechanics) knowledge and hands-on experience in successfully integrating diverse system elements. He is passionate about creating something from nothing and enjoys working with smart dedicated people that make the impossible seem less so. His mission at Intellectual Ventures Laboratory is to apply his creative scientific and engineering expertise towards the application of inventive electronics technology solutions that will successfully meet or exceed customer requirements and at the same time overcome technical and practical challenges associated with their development, production and final implementation. 

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Prior to joining IV Laboratories, Mr. Nash was Senior Staff Engineer in the Optics & Photonics Group at Microvision, Inc., of Redmond, WA, a developer of innovative light scanning imaging systems. During his 11+ years with the company he was the recipient of multiple individual achievement awards for demonstrated excellence in R&D engineering efforts related to the advancement of edge emitting LED and laser MEMS scanning technology.  Mr. Nash led complex and multidisciplinary development of key innovations, including the formation of their Special Projects Group where he designed and hand built many of the proof-of-concept technology hardware “firsts” that were precursors to the company’s commercial, medical and military imaging and display solutions.

Mr. Nash received his bachelor’s degree in electronics engineering from University of Toronto, Rochdale and is an associate member of the Society of Automotive and Aerospace Engineers.

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Daniel Arnitz, Ph.D.

Research Scientist

Dr. Daniel Arnitz is a Research Scientist at the Metamaterials Commercialization Center (MCC) of Intellectual Ventures in Bellevue, WA. Before joining the MCC in 2016, Dr. Arnitz worked on microwave and millimeter-wave imaging, backscatter channels, RFID, and MIMO wireless power transfer at the University of Washington, WA, and at Duke University, NC. Dr. Arnitz received his master’s degree Dipl.-Ing.(FH) in 2005 from FH Joanneum Kapfenberg, Austria, and a Ph.D. (Dr. techn.) from Graz University of Technology, Austria, in 2011. He held several Chair positions at the IEEE RFID series of conferences, including Technical Program Committee Chair in 2012 and 2013 and General Chair in 2016.

Joe Hagerty, PH.D.

Research Scientist

Joe Hagerty specializes in nonlinear circuit techniques for high power RF applications. His previous projects have included linearization methods for GaN technology, high efficiency active antennas and solutions for broadband impedance matching. Joe’s contributions bring together nonlinear analysis, electromagnetic characterization and integrated measurements to approach the problems associated with wireless power transfer, metamaterials science and device physics. He received his Ph.D. in Applied Electromagnetics from the University of Colorado at Boulder in 2003.

Yaroslav Urzhumov, Ph.D.

Metamaterials Technologist

Yaroslav Urzhumov joined Metamaterials Commercialization Center in its birth year of 2013, to pursue commercialization of novel metamaterial applications. Dr. Urzhumov brought multi-disciplinary expertise in areas such as nanophotonics and plasmonics, acoustics and phononics, CFD and computational physics. Yaroslav’s interest in metamaterials dates back a decade earlier to 2003, when he began implementing plasmonic and phonon-polaritonic superlenses. His passion is to develop fast design and prototyping approaches that enable rapid materialization of innovative concepts in devices.

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Yaroslav has invented dozens of novel techniques and applications and is a co-inventor on more than 60 issued and pending patents. Dr. Urzhumov is also an adjunct faculty at Duke University, where he previously was a research faculty of Electrical and Computer Engineering and a Principal Investigator on research grants. A Senior Member of SPIE, IEEE and APS as well as an author of over 70 scientific publications with an h-index of 24 and more than 2400 journal citations.

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David Smith

Prof. David R. Smith

Strategic Advisor

Dr. David R. Smith is currently the James B. Duke Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering Department at Duke University, where he also serves as Department Chair. He is also Director of the Center for Metamaterial and Integrated Plasmonics at Duke and holds the positions of Adjunct Associate Professor in the Physics Department at the University of California, San Diego, and Visiting Professor of Physics at Imperial College, London. Dr. Smith received his Ph.D. in 1994 in Physics from the University of California, San Diego (UCSD). Dr. Smith’s research interests include the theory, simulation and characterization of unique electromagnetic structures, including photonic crystals and metamaterials.

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Smith is best known for his theoretical and experimental work on electromagnetic metamaterials. Metamaterials are artificially structured materials, whose electromagnetic properties can be tailored and tuned in ways not easily accomplished with conventional materials. Smith has been at the forefront in the development of numerical methods to design and characterize metamaterials, and has also provided many of the key experiments that have helped to illustrate the potential that metamaterials offer. Smith and his colleagues at UCSD demonstrated the first left-handed (or negative index) metamaterial at microwave frequencies in 2000–a material that had been predicted theoretically more than thirty years prior by Russian physicist Victor Veselago. No naturally occurring material or compound with a negative index-of-refraction had ever been reported until this experiment. In 2001, Smith and colleagues followed up with a second experiment confirming one of Veselago’s key conjectures: the ‘reversal’ of Snell’s law. These two papers–the first published in Physical Review Letters and the second in Science–generated enormous interest throughout the community in the possibility of metamaterials to extend and augment the properties of conventional materials. Both papers have now been cited more than 3,000 times each.

Since those first metamaterial experiments, Smith has continued to study the fundamentals and potential applications of negative index media and metamaterials. In 2004, Smith began studying the potential of metamaterials as a means to produce novel gradient index media. By varying the index-of-refraction throughout a material, an entire class of optical elements (such as lenses) can be formed. Smith showed that metamaterials could access a much larger range of design space, since both the magnetic and the electric properties could be graded independently. Smith and colleagues demonstrated several versions of gradient index optics, an activity that continues in his lab today. The introduction of controlled spatial gradients in the electromagnetic properties of a metamaterial flows naturally into the broad concept of transformation optics – a new electromagnetic design approach proposed by Sir John Pendry in 2006. To illustrate of the novelty of this design approach, Pendry, Schurig and Smith suggested in 2006 that an ‘invisibility cloak’ could be realized by a metamaterial implementation of a transformation optical design. Later that same year, Smith’s group at Duke University reported the demonstration of a transformation optical designed ‘invisibility cloak’ at microwave frequencies. The concept of transformation optics has since attracted the attention of the scientific community, and is now a rapidly emerging sub-discipline in the field.

Smith’s work on transformation optics has been featured in nearly every major newspaper, including a cover story in USA Today, The New York Times, The Chicago Tribune, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post and many more. Smith and his work on cloaking have also been featured on television news programs inlcuding The Today Show, Countdown with Keith Olbermann, Fox News, CNN and MSNBC. Smith’s work has also been highlighted in documentary programs on The History Channel, The Discovery Channel, The Science Channel, the BBC and others.

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Prof. Matthew S. Reynolds

Strategic Advisor

Matt Reynolds is an Associate Professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering and the Paul G. Allen School of Computer Science and Engineering (joint appointment) at the University of Washington. He was previously the Nortel Networks Assistant Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Duke University. He is also co-founder of the RFID systems firm ThingMagic Inc (acquired by Trimble Navigation), the energy conservation firm Zensi (acquired by Belkin), and the home sensing company SNUPI Inc (acquired by Sears Holding Company).

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Matt’s research interests include microwave and millimeter wave imaging, energy efficiency at the physical layer of wireless communication, and the physics of sensing and actuation. Matt received the Ph.D. from the MIT Media Lab in 2003, where he was a Motorola Fellow, as well as S.B. and M.Eng. degrees in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from MIT. He is a Senior Member of the IEEE, has received five Best Paper awards at IEEE and ACM conferences, and has 42 issued and over 62 pending US patents. He is a UW CoMotion Presidential Innovation Faculty Fellow.

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University Collaboration

Building on its history of in-house invention, Intellectual Ventures (IV) has developed relationships with numerous professors and universities to co-invent and patent metamaterials related technologies. This decade-long collaboration has generated a rich portfolio of novel metamaterial ideas and technologies and continues today to expand IV’s role in the metamaterials community. IV holds especially strong relationships with inventors at Duke University, University of California at San Diego and Imperial College.

Visit Duke’s Metamaterial site »